Thursday, February 24, 2022

Opening Doors: STEM Learning and Access for All

By Kristen Bott Nordstrom


As both a teacher in a public school for over 20 years, and a nonfiction writer, the question of how to deeply engage my learners and readers is always on my mind. What is their entry point? How do they connect?

I’ve discovered there are so many ways. Listening to my students play a math game always brings a smile to my face. The number patterns they discover as they hop around a hundreds chart is exciting!  Could it even be sifting through a pile of dirt in earth science? There’s gravel, sand, clay, and even humus in that brown blob!

Maybe it’s an interdisciplinary project-based investigation like the one we are into now. We’re researching a wildlife crossing that is being built in our area. With student questions driving our project, and excellent nonfiction books in our hands to answer them, we’re researching why and how animals will use this bridge. We’re even building our own wildlife crossings with guidance and feedback from the landscape architect that designed the project, a UCLA biologist, and the project manager.

At the core, the students connect to this project through their questions, the experts we bring to our classroom, and through their desire to help the diverse wildlife population in our area - mountain lions, black-tailed deer, California quail, and even tarantulas! They wonder, investigate, make sense of things, and contemplate how they could make a difference in the world.

These are the essential elements to dynamic learning that I believe open doors for all learners. These ideas have pushed me to new places as a teacher and are ideas percolating in the back of my mind as I write.  


  


Four years ago I became a founding member of a Title 1 STEAM school. At the time, I felt the world was changing in troubling directions, and I was inspired to work with other dedicated teachers and one awesome principal to bring the power of hands-on science to a beautiful and diverse group of students including children on the autism spectrum, bilingual learners (Mandarin, Punjabi, Spanish) and foster youth. We use the Next Generation Science Standards coupled with project-based learning as our guide, but the true center is the curiosity of our learners. This is where we engage our learners and access the curriculum. We start by asking questions, strive for conceptual mastery, and learn the vocabulary along the way. It was also during this transition in my teaching practice, that I found the final “layer” in my nonfiction writing. Mimic Makers: Biomimicry Inventors Inspired by Nature was in the editorial process with Charlesbridge Publishing. My biomimicry story was finding a way to integrate with the brilliant illustrations of Paul Boston for the first time. It’s been a journey. Here are some of the tidbits of truth I’ve gleaned along the way.

1. Be honest. If you’re an educator, has your school or district mandated a curriculum that has reduced your teaching to scripted guides and worksheets? Find a place to bring back curiosity in the classroom. Maybe start with daily read-alouds using excellent books that inspire your students to wonder about the world. As a nonfiction writer juggling loads of information, I had to work hard to keep the curiosity at the core of my writing. The beginning of Mimic Makers was scientifically correct, but the questions were gone. A revision brought them back plus an opportunity to weave the theme of children-investigating-the-world into the text, illustrations, and back matter.



2. Be proactively inclusive.  We don’t take our togetherness for granted in my classroom. We talk about who we are as a community of learners, who we are as individuals, and how we can work as a team. We practice whole body listening, share our thoughts in community circles, and seek to understand one another in an accepting environment. Everybody has a place in the circle and everything we learn academically is dependent upon these conversations. Children learn in safe places that acknowledge and validate their existence in the world. Diverse books help us along this path. They expand our minds, our hearts, and start important discussions. We depend on authors to write relevant books to help us process our difficult feelings, celebrate our uniqueness, and honor different points of view and life experiences.                                                                              


3. Be patient. My favorite t-shirt that I wear to school is starting to fray around the edges. I’m going to keep on wearing it because the words on the front are my mantra: “Progress over Perfection”. This is the message I hope to convey to my students, and these are the words I remember myself as I chip away at another manuscript in the pre-dawn hours. We strive for excellence, but we measure our success by the progress we make. 

4. Celebrate the creative problem-solver. The shift from the old science standards, where students were expected to memorize, memorize, memorize, to the NGSS (Next Generation Science Standards) has been profound. We are no longer passive recipients of information.  We investigate, problem-solve, and design solutions all day long. We are thankful for all the books with feisty protagonists that inspire us to persist when we face setbacks. We are thankful for all the biographies that profile a diverse group of people who have faced adversity, served humanity, and accomplished great deeds. We need their stories.       

            
        


Give It a Try

Pick five of your favorite nonfiction books (the ones you wish you wrote) and go on a scavenger hunt.  For each book, find the way(s) the author stimulated a child’s curiosity.  Make a list.  Some things to look for:

      Are the readers wondering what will happen next? Is this part of a narrative nonfiction story that has captured the reader’s attention?

      Are there well-crafted page turns that have the reader flipping through those pages - curious to find what will come next?

      Is there a discrepant event or discrepant picture that gets a child wondering?  

      Has the author taken the child to a new place - the inside of a beehive or through the lens of a powerful microscope to reveal something new? 

       Does the author pose questions that prompts a child to wonder at key places in their book?  Where are those places?  How does this drive the flow of the book?                                

When you have this list, see if you can find a place in your manuscript where you can incorporate one or two good ideas.  Good luck :)


Meet The Author:

Kristen Nordstrom, M.Ed, has been teaching for more than twenty years and is a founding member of a Title 1 STEAM magnet school. She is nationally certified as a STEM educator and has extensive training with the Lawrence Hall of Science. Her debut picture book, Mimic Makers: Biomimicry Inventors Inspired by Nature is illustrated by Paul Boston. It profiles ten working inventors from around the world that have studied nature, made a discovery, and applied their understanding to inventions that help people and the planet. It is a Junior Library Gold Standard Selection, CYBILS Nonfiction Picture Book Finalist, NSTA’s Best STEM Picture Books of 2022 List, and the AAAS/Subaru Best STEM Picture Book of 2022.www.kristennordstrom.com, Twitter: @KristenNordstr1, IS: knordynord                                             







40 comments:

  1. Congrats on your new book and for sharing your insight about helping children wonder what will happen next in a book.

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    1. Thank you Bettie. Best of luck with your writing.

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  2. Thank you Kristen for the thoughtful tips!

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  3. great post, Kristen! And a good activity for us to work on.

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    1. Thank you Sue. Best of luck with the writing activity.

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  4. Wonderful list of standards to judge our own stories and those already published. Thank you.

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    1. You are welcome Sue. Best of luck with your writing.

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  5. Thank you for your excellent post. Your students are very fortunate to have you and vice versa! I am looking forward to doing your "Give it a Try" and to reading Mimic Makers. Congratulations!

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    1. You are welcome Melissa. Best of luck with the "Give it a Try" recommendations.

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    1. Thanks Dianne. Best of luck with your writing.

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  7. Thank you, Kristen, for sharing this informative post.

    Suzy Leopold

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  8. As a teacher and a writer, I really appreciated your post. It is a hard balance between what we are told to teach vs finding ways to get students to flex their creative muscles. I can't wait to look through my latest WIP after reading this post.

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    1. Oh I'm so glad you got something from this post. Best of luck with your WIP, Maryellen.

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  9. Kristen,
    Enjoyed your article. Im excited about the creative problem solver! My granddaughter loves your book. ❤️Thanks for the post.

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  10. Janie, I'm so happy you enjoyed the article. Thanks for stopping by.

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  11. That STEAM school sounds amazing!! I wish there were more educators like you to create inclusive environments to challenge and lead the next generations. The world would become a better place.

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  12. I enjoyed Mimic Makers: Biomimicry Inventors Inspired by Nature, and you sound like an amazing teacher, Kristen! Thank you for your helpful list of suggestions to try.

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    1. So happy you enjoyed MIMIC MAKERS! I appreciate your kind comments.

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  13. What a wonderful school with curiousity at the center! Congratulations and thanks for a great post!

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  14. I love how you and your students are working on wildlife crossings!

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    1. It was a fun project. My students read CROSSINGS again and again :)

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  15. Thank you, Kristen, for this informative post. I appreciate your list of suggestions!

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  16. I'm so glad you found the post helpful. Best of luck with the suggestions.

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  17. Fabulous ideas to encourage curiosity and wonder. The key to life long learning!
    Thank you.

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    1. Thank you, Peggy. Yes, life long learning is the key!

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  18. Very intrigued by your book! Great post. Took lots of notes!

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    1. Thank you, Denise. Best of luck with your writing.

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  19. Kristen, How fun to see your wonderful post here this year. Keep doing your wonderful, encouraging work!

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  20. Great post and challenge Kristen, thanks. And I agree that your school sounds like where I wished I'd gone when I was a kid! Can't wait to see what you do next.

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    1. You are welcome, McMarshall. I appreciate your encouraging comments. All the best with your writing.

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  21. Oh, if only all kids could have an enthusiastic, creative teacher like you. This post is refreshing. Thank you.

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  22. You are such a wonderful teacher and creative writer! I only wish all kids were involved in learning using their curiosity as a key. This is a wonderful post!

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  23. I am inspired by your enthusiasm and educational approach.

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  24. Thanks for the fun scavenger hunt idea!

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