Wednesday, February 12, 2020

What Do I Do With All That Stuff?!

By Cynthia Levinson
  
Credit: Sam Bond
Notes on journal articles. Underlining in books. Audio recordings of interviews. Video recordings of locations. Scans of archived materials. Microfilmed newspapers. Lists of contacts. Photographs of photographs. Ephemera. I’ve collected all of this and more while researching and writing my five published and three forthcoming nonfiction books, two dozen articles, and another two dozen blog posts for kids. How do I make sense of it all? Organize it? Retrieve what I need when I need it? Find that one elusive footnote source?!


Happily, as evidenced by some of the best nonfiction writers, there are many ways to manage your research, including

Compiling and Organizing My Research

For me, everything starts with—and goes into—Evernote. This computer-based program allows me to compile and organize all kinds of material (well, except for actual things)—text, video, and audio files. I also like that Evernote clips the content on webpages, which I can then annotate. In addition, it digitizes all text, whether it’s a typed document, handwritten notes, a PDF, email messages, a photograph, a website or a scanned image, so that I can easily search for a word or phrase in any of them.  

Each item of my research (or sometimes a group of items, like scans of pages from the same book) becomes a Note. Notes that are about the same topic go into a Notebook. Notebooks that are all about the same project are compiled into a Stack.  

Let me give you some examples. Here’s a snippet of my list of Notebooks and Stacks:



The Notebooks inside the BEN SHAHN Stack line up like this:
 


Notes in a Notebook can be listed in alphabetical order according to the title I give it or by date, size, source or location. Although I organize mine alphabetically, the date feature is helpful when citing a website in the Source Notes or Bibliography because you’ll want to include the date you consulted the web in case the page has been removed or changed.
 


Put all together, my monitor looks like this:
 


Actually, this is on my second monitor. I display research there and place what I’m writing on the computer’s screen. 

As you can see from the upper-right corner, I can also share my Notes with an illustrator or editor. To help with searching and cross-referencing information, I can add Tags to Notes as well. Evernote becomes my book bible and is available both on my computer and, via the web, on other devices. So, it’s easy to insert material into the right Notebook wherever I’m doing research, even if I’m only carrying a cell phone.

Source Notes

To keep track of my sources, I follow the Belt-and-Suspenders Rule or maybe Tammany Hall’s Vote-Early/Vote-Often Rule. Book titles, page numbers, web addresses, dates of interviews, etc. are stored not only in Evernote but also in my Timelines (see below) and, for quotations, in the endnotes of my manuscripts—even for picture books, which, when published do not generally include endnotes. In fact, I use both endnotes and footnotes in my manuscripts. The former hold citations for quotations. The latter hold information for the editor or illustrator.  

Nevertheless, I’ve managed to lose and have had to burrow for one source for every book!

Timelines

Timelines, which journalists call tick-tocks, are the sine qua non for nonfiction research and writing. You must make at least one for every project: that’s a command! These are not the timelines you’ll include in your back matter; those will be pared to the most essential information for readers. These timelines hold the details of your explorations in chronological order. The task of filling them in and the questions you’ll need to ask to do so can help you uncover new information and reveal relationships. (That’s how I realized, for example, that Dr. King wrote Letter from Birmingham Jail during the Children’s March. It was an aha moment.) 

To accomplish this, a straightforward list of dates and events is often not sufficient. Depending on the scope and theme of the project, I make a chart with different headings. 

For instance, the timeline about Ben Shahn, which shows how his artwork reflected contemporary political events, juxtaposes key moments in his life with a larger context of the times.

Timeline from Ben Shahn: The People’s Painter


Snapshots of Ben Shahn’s Life
The Bigger Picture
1898
Ben Shahn was born to Hessel and Gittel Shahn in Kovno, Lithuania.
Lithuania was part of The Pale of Settlement, the area within the Russian Empire where Jews were allowed to live.
1902
Hessel was exiled to Siberia.
Czar Nicholas II ordered pogroms—attacks—against Jews in The Pale of Settlement.
1906
Ben and his family immigrated to New York.
Nearly a million immigrants entered the United States at Ellis Island that year.

For a book that has nine main characters on two continents (appropriately, given that there were so many of them to juggle, it was a book about circus!), my timeline included columns not only for dates and events but also for the people involved in each event, the country where they took place, and even their skill—trampoline, wire-walking, etc. 

Above all, it’s critical that at least one of your timelines (have I mentioned that I often make more than one for each book?) shows how events, activities, and people relate and respond to each other, how they interact, rebel, and help one another—and, finally, the outcomes. This is where the heart of your book resides. It really is the tick and the tock. Take a look at part of a timeline for a book I wrote about civil rights.

Timeline for the Children’s March, Day-By-Day

Date
Kids’ Actions
Leaders’ Actions
City & State
Reactions
Federal Action
Results
Thurs, May 2 (D Day)
·   Came from as far as Fairfield. 20 climbed in car; 800 walked (CM video)
·   Leave churches in groups of 50. 10 groups get to City Hall where they kneel & pray. (Walk, p, 58)
·   DJ: “There will be a party in the park…Bring your toothbrushes.”
·   Sign: “It’s time.”
·   Bevel called a lunch break, then started up again
·   700 arrested, bond @ $500 (Walk, p, 58). Almost 1000 arrested (CM video). 959 arrested (Kasher).


May 3 (Double-D Day)
·   Up to 2000 march toward Park & City Hall at noon.

·   MLK & S’worth hold news conference: demos will continue
·   3000 spectators
·   Connor bellowed, “Let ‘em have it!” Fire hoses.
·   20 minutes later—dogs (Walk, p. 59)
·   Several hundred arrested (Walk). 1922 arrested (CM video)
·   JFK says photos make him sick
· Kids, firemen, and journalists hospitalized

Displayed here, succinctly but powerfully, are the actions and reactions that propelled the civil rights movement. Note that I color-coded them to indicate which material would go into the book. And, as I mentioned, I included sources for the information.

Contacts

This might seem obvious but color-coded charts are also useful for keeping track of the people you interview or reach out to. My column headers are generally as follows; note that I’ve learned to include birth dates!

 
LAST NAME
FIRST NAME
AFFILIATION
TITLE
BACKGROUND INFO
REFERRED BY
CONTACT INFO
CONTACT DATES
NOTES
ASADI
Ahmed
Circus Galilee
Performer--globe
Muslim
Bday: June 2014
Bro of Hla
Marc
Tel: __
Address: __
Deir al Asad
in person: July 2012
Chatty!



This is a rather idiosyncratic overview of what I do with all my stuff. I’m sure you’ll find the ways that work for you!


ABOUT THE AUTHOR


Cynthia Levinson’s books include We’ve Got a Job, The Youngest Marcher, Watch Out for Flying Kids, and, with her husband, Fault Lines in the Constitution, available in text and, soon, as a graphic novel. Two picture books are forthcoming. Her books have won, among other honors, the Julia Ward Howe, Crystal Kite, Orbis Pictus, ILA Social Justice, and Parents Choice Gold Awards. Her research and writing have given her the opportunity to walk with foot soldiers of the civil rights movement, fall off a tight-wire, and read letters housed in a condemned building.






ABOUT THE PRIZE 

Cynthia will be happy to send an autographed copy of Fault Lines in the Constitution to a lucky winner.

Leave one comment below about what struck you in the post.
You’re eligible to win if you’re a registered NF Fest participant and you have contributed one comment below.   

151 comments:

  1. I love seeing how other people organize!! I really like how you set up your timelines. I also do this for my historical projects, but yours looks so much neater than mine. :) I also set up a biographical glossary of people--even if they'll never make it into the book. It helps me make those bigger picture connections that I might not notice otherwise. Thank you for this post and links to others' ways of organizing as well!

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  2. Thank you for this peek at how you organize your research. It opened my eyes to some new ways to do it.

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  3. Thanks for sharing how you organize your research and for the explanation into Evernote. I also appreciated learning about your timelines and how they inform your research and writing.

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  4. Organizing research is a daunting prospect but your post has given multiple ways to check out. I appreciated the samples you shared. Thanks, Cynthia

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  5. Thank you so much, Cynthia! Your post will revolutionize how I keep track (or loose track) of all the stuff I gather while researching. I've been using Scrivner but would like to give Evernote a whirl. I feel better going as paper-free as possible.

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  6. Great post, Cynthia! Thank you for sharing how you organize your research. I enjoyed seeing how other writers organize their information as well. I tend to do a combination of Donna Janell Bowman’s three-ring binders and Lawrence Wright's index cards (which are color-coded) I will definitely be checking out Evernote!

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  7. So much to keep track of. In one of my MG novels I had many pieces of seemingly unrelated research. This article would have been very helpful then ��

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  8. A daunting task and I will look at this post again once my research gets going full steam in this next week. I learned in another job, middle initials or a middle name, on photographs are essential-especially for women as those maiden names often get lost and then you have even fewer clues going forth. Thanks!

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  9. I'm always looking for tips on notekeeping. Perfect!

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  10. Thanks for the tips on note taking...loved the 'tick tock' never heard a timeline called that before!

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  11. Keeping track of all the gathered information is a huge part of managing the research. Thanks so much for these note keeping tips.

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  12. WOW -- so interesting and organized. My "chaotic order" Pisces brain is in awed. Thank you so very much for sharing, Cynthia!

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  13. This is brilliantly organized! Lots of ideas for going forward! Thanks, Cynthia!

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  14. I really liked the example of: "the timeline about Ben Shahn, which shows how his artwork reflected contemporary political events, juxtaposes key moments in his life with a larger context of the times." Yes, very helpful.

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  15. Wow, this really shares the nitty-gritty of a NF Hathor's backstory on the story. Thank you for all the specific notes and screenshots. This is pure gold, Cynthia. Love YOUNGEST MARCHER. You should give an incisive on this for SCBWI.

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  16. I love reading how other writers organize their research. This was so helpful, especially your description of the way you use a timeline.

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  17. Superb example of organizing information in order to mine the gems and paint the setting!

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  18. This post is filled with outstanding methods to organize research gathered to support a nonfiction project. The tick-tocks aka timelines are valuable.

    Thank you, Cynthia.

    Suzy Leopold

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  19. Wow this post is amazing and filled with lots of great idea. Thank you so much Cynthia.

    -Karen Brueggeman

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  20. Impressive! Thank you.

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  21. This post is a gold mine of useful tips! I've always just shoved everything in a word doc but it's great to see how you are organizing everything with Evernote. I have used Evernote with my students before to make e-portfolios of their work but have not used it for myself-may have to revisit. I absolutely love the multi-column timelines-thanks for this peak at your process! -Sara Ackerman

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  22. Thank you Cynthia for your important work and showing us how you organize.
    I too am a lifey color coordinated organiner, the instant visual of color is the best organizer for me!
    And, you can stay in the same color hue for each connecting item.
    Looking forward to more of your books!

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  23. These are amazing ideas for organizing all the research material I have! Thanks so much!

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  24. Thanks for the tips. I have Evernote on my computer but haven't yet used it. It's helpful to "see" how it can be used.

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  25. This sounds like a super organized way to story "everything". My own paper management technique is much more "primitive." I collect printed articles, make research notes in a word file,and then compose my story.

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  26. These are fantastic tips and tools for different styles. So far, I haven't needed anything this complex, but it's great to know what's out there and how it works. It must make things so easy for your fact checkers that they love you.

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  27. Loved the tic toc, too! Thank you, Cynthia, for your generosity in sharing how you organize! I look forward to your upcoming webinar through The Writing Barn.

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  28. These details, particularly about Evernote, really helped me. Organizing research is critical. Thanks for sharing!

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  29. What a fantastic resource for organizing everything you need to write your non fiction titles. Thank you!

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  30. What a comprehensive window into your system. I have been using OneNote, but I think I'll have to check out Evernote. I really like your charts--I'm a chart person, too! Thanks for your post:)

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  31. I appreciate getting a glimpse of the system you use for taking notes and keeping track of everything, Cynthia. Thank you for sharing this, and all the resources you provided!

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  32. Thanks for the look into how you organize research especially the timeline charts.

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  33. Cynthia, it is no wonder that your books have such acclaim. This explanation of your research process/synthesizing is mind-bending. Thank you for sharing.

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  34. It's impressive how super organized you are. I'm somewhere between cardboard boxes, paper folders and Microsoft docs! Thanks for giving me something to aspire to. Must try Evernote!

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  36. This post is so helpful! Thank you very much for sharing your organizational tools and tips!

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  37. I'm striving to be more organized in 2020! Right now I toggle between a spiral notebook and Word. I've tried Evernote but didn't really care for it. I might revisit it. This post was extremely helpful. Will definitely revisit.

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  38. I love the timelines and looking at the broader picture. Thanks for the advice

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  39. I totally geek out making timelines during my research. It's the best way for me to keep track of all the details. During my last project (a picture book) - I had about 4-5 timelines going on simultaneously! It blew me away. I always include a source column so I can go back and find where I got the information (and cross-reference if multiple sources). Such a great way to research and put it all in perspective!

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  40. I, too, use Evernote, but I've always put everything into one notebook for each project. Why have I never heard of stacks???? This makes so much sense. Arg. Arg. Looks like I'll be stacking in the future. AND making different kinds of timelines, too, ones that aren't targeted toward being included in the book. Thanks for the tips!!!

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  41. Thank you Cynthia for showing us the ins and outs of Evernote! Be Inspired, Nicki Jacobsmeyer

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  42. The timeline examples are going to invaluable for my research and writing. That could be a separate post! The evernote ins and outs was also extremely valuable. I'm thinking about re-upping my subscription now.

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  43. I'm always asking...what to do, where to put it, how to find it again????? Thank you. Not that I'll get things right the first time or the second, but oh my, something to go by!!! Thank you so much for this most helpful post!

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  44. Oh, my--organizing is not my strength. Everything goes into a wicker box. I am so impressed with how you do things! Thanks for sharing!

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  45. Your timelines are inspirational. Helpful. Thank you.

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  46. I used Evernote at one time...I'm not sure why I gave it up--it looks awesome!

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  47. Amazing--it's great to see how other NF writers organize their research; looks like your system has lead to many award-winning books!

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  48. Your organization is amazing! Thank you for sharing.

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  49. Cynthia-If only your readers had an idea how much, and how varied, is organization behind the books you've published! Thanks for so generously sharing how you utilize Evernote, timelines, and color coding what will actually go into the book. I found it especially interesting to see how you noted the 'larger picture' of what was happening as you focused on your specific area of research.

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  50. Wow, wow, wow, wow, wow! Thanks for such a great post. I've been using Evernote for years and you notes and notebooks the same way you do, but never realized there was a Stack function! That may be a game changer! How did I not know that?! :-) And I love your timeline boxes. Brilliant. Thanks so much!!!!!

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  51. Cynthia's concrete charts are wonderful for record keeping of timelines and contacts. I will USE those. Thanks for validating all the ways successful writers, like you, keep your stuff!
    Melanie Vickers

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  52. Wow! Now I need to go and reorganize all of my notes. I will have to try Evernote. Thanks.

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  53. This is so helpful! I especially liked seeing how you use Evernote, which revealed I clearly have not explored it enough! I am rather fond of my index cards, though, mostly for shuffling into timelines like you do to find connections. Thank you for this!

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  54. Holy cow. Mind officially blown.
    Seriously, this is excellent advice. Thank you.

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  55. I had no idea Evernote was so versatile - wow! Great article :)

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  56. Amazing tips and examples of ways to organize our project research! I've been using notebooks, cards, and folders. Thank you for this post Cynthia :)

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  57. Cynthia, thank you for letting us take a peek behind the curtain. Love your time lines and how you use Evernote.

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  58. It's so enlightening to see Cynthia's notes and her process! I use Evernote but now I think I'm not using it well enough. I need to learn how to make it work better for me. Thanks!

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  59. Thanks for the tips! You have an amazing system.

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  60. Wow! A daunting task, but I love the idea of a timeline to help you find connections.

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  61. You are so organized and have a great system. I've done timelines and used index cards for my fiction stories, but your way seems much easier. Thanks, Cynthia, for sharing your ideas.

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  62. Thank you for revealing how your organization system works. I had no idea that Evernote could digitize.
    My system is like Donna Janell Bowman's. My office is overrun with three-ring binders and my phone is full of photographs of things like grave stones and old birth certificates.

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  63. Thank you for sharing your system--very impressive! The concrete examples were great to see.

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  64. I always love to learn how people organize their thoughts and their writing! I have used Evernote to keep track of student conversations, so it's great to see how you use it in your research. Thanks for your generosity of thought!

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  65. Thank you for giving us a peek into your absolutely awesome system of organization. I'm both inspired and intimidated!

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  66. Thank you! The examples of charts are especially helpful--much better than the sticky notes assemblage I used recently.

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  67. Such a wonderful system, so helpful! Thank you

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  68. Really an aha! moment to see how convenient Evernote can be. Thank you for sharing your methods, system and tools - always useful to see how others organize their materials. Priscilla

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  69. Thanks for these ideas. I am finding that the more I dig into writing NF the more I need my research to be better organized.

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  70. Cynthia, thanks for showing us new ideas in organizing. I have research in Evernote- love it for the ease of the clipper! I’ve been using scrivener now to write and am building notebooks there. It’s still overwhelming. But I think the way you use timelines is showing is how important that tool is when writing. Thanks for the detailed post!

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  71. Thanks for sharing so many specific details and examples! It's easy to start to feel overwhelmed when you're trying to figure out how to organize all the information that needs to be gathered. Having these real-world examples makes it a less-daunting process!

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  72. Now, that's organIzation. So inspiring to see the amount of work and detail that goes into creating the final product.
    Thank you for sharing a little of your process - so helpful ! And a little intimidating:)

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  73. Wow, you're incredibly organized! Thanks for sharing your process with us.

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  74. Thanks for generously sharing your process! This is something I must pay greater attention to, and you have given me great ideas on methods or practices for keeping, filing, and accessing information. I especially liked the timeline you shared and the quote that encapsulates it all:
    "a timeline that shows how events, activities, and people relate and respond to each other, how they interact, rebel, and help one another - and finally, the outcomes. This is where the heart of your book resides." Thanks so much!

    Celia Viramontes

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  75. I love seeing how different people organize. I had Evernote... then lost it. :( Technology is a mean tool at times. Thanks for sharing your examples with us.

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  76. Organization is not my strong suit but I'm working on it! Love how organized you are.

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  77. Thanks for sharing your organizational methods and tools, Cynthia. You've sold me on Evernote!

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  78. I am unfamiliar with Evernote. I'll have to explore it. It was interest g to see what systrms others use and to get a glimpse of your folders and tic-tocs. Thank you.

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  79. All of this material can be intimidating. Thank you for these great organizing tips.

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  80. Thank you so much for this! Your organizational tools make so much sense! I can't wait to put your ideas to the test.

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  81. Wow! Although I have never used Evernote, the process you have shown us is extremely helpful in deciding how to set up a useful research orgnaization system. Thank you!

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  82. Thank you, Cynthia for this comprehensive report on how you organize your research. You are a master of organization!

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  83. Wow! I will never look at timelines the same way. Your organizational process is incredibly thorough - I am in awe of your system, Cynthia!

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  84. You have inspired me to be MUCH more organized in my research, note-taking, overview of my project, and writing in general. I've heard of Evernote but this is a wonderful overview of exactly HOW to make it work for me. Thank you!

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  85. So helpful to see how you organize. Thanks for sharing.

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  86. Thanks! Much-needed tips on how to get organized.

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  87. Pretty amazing. I think I'd have to tie myself to your side to follow the process ; )
    Really, very insightful. thnx

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  89. Thanks for sharing your process. It's given me some ideas on how I can organize mine better.

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  90. Thanks for a peek into your research organization. And Ben Shahn!!! You're writing about Ben Shahn! He was a favorite of my mother's, and I inherited a print as well as an old copy of his book, The Shape of Content, which I'm sure you've read.

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  91. Thanks for sharing the great ways you organize your research. It's interesting to learn how different NF authors do this.

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  92. EXTREMELY helpful to see how you organize your research. You've inspired me!

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  93. Wow! Organization perfection. I learned about Evernote. Thanks for sharing.

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  94. Cynthia! A goldmine of advice...I've been relying on OneNote, which is useful to gather and collect ideas/facts/resources, but just this peek into your Evernote (AND knowing it jives with Scrivener) may just sway me into taking a closer look at it. (I wonder if I can export my OneNote collections over to Evernote somehow...?)

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  95. Wow. This post makes me realize I need to be much more organized when keeping track of my research. Evernote seems like a wonderful tool to this end. I will check it out. Thanks, Cynthia!

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  96. I love the way you use timelines for your books, especially the way you look at a person's life in connection to the bigger picture. Thank you!

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  97. Thank you for sharing your organizing tips, Cynthia! I especially like how you've organized the timelines to keep track of not only the key events in your subjects' lives, but also the bigger picture & meanings.

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  98. Wow, Cynthia! Thanks for sharing your research and organizing tips! This is so helpful. I look forward to reading your upcoming books! And I wrote in bold in my notes that I must organize a timeline for my project!

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  99. Organization tips...you are my hero! Thank you.

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  100. Some great tips on organizing. This is very helpful. Thanks for sharing! It will take a while to digest everything.

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  101. Always interesting to see how everyone tackles organizing. I've tried evernote, but I always end up in a spreadsheet, which seems wrong as a writer but works for me.

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  102. You are so organized, Cynthia! You offered so many ways to collect and catalogue information. Thank you for sharing.

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  103. I've never used Evernote. I'll definitely be looking into that this weekend. Thanks!

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  104. Thank you for the post, Cynthia! I love organizing, and I love how many ways there are to do it. You showed me even more uses for Evernote which is great.

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  105. Thank you for the organizing ideas. You showed me new ways that I hadn't heard of before your post.

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  106. Incredibly helpful post. I had only recently started using OneNote, and was still thinking in terms of one notebook per project, not several. I loved the suggestion to use both endnotes and footnotes. Thanks so much!

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  107. Your timeline tables are a game changer for one of my projects. I love how you format them and collect multiple perspectives and actions together.

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  108. Wow that is amazing. It's like having a receipt for each piece of information you use in your text that may be needed as proof in case you're asked and/or for backing your truth.
    -Ashley Congdon

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  109. I think I need to improve my methods for storing and labelling research material. Wow, this is amazing.

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  110. Thanks for sharing how your organize your research material. I also appreciate that you noted how others do it as well.

    This post has been so helpful. Thank you!

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  111. This is super helpful! Thank you for sharing the details. I plan to politely lift your approach!

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  112. Wow! Thanks for sharing the details of your process. I'm a huge fan of Evernote and my notebooks aren't limited to manuscripts. I keep notebooks for recipes, vacation ideas, MAC notes... I will keep the timeline idea in mind, but often time isn't as necessary in books about science.

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  113. I have never used Evernote. Now I'm eager to check it out. Thanks for sharing.

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  114. Thanks you Cynthia for sharing your filing secrets1

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  115. Extremely helpful overview of using timelines. Thank you!

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  116. WOW! Thanks for sharing how you organize your research.

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  117. You're an expert at organization, Cynthia. Thanks for the detailed information and photos that make your process clear. WOW

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  118. Thanks for sharing your system in so much detail. The timelines are the piece I was missing. Going to look at Evernote, too.

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  119. Out of curiosity, are other aspects of your life just as wonderfully organized as your writing notes? :) And I appreciate the fact that you research & note the "bigger picture"

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  120. Wow! What great information. Thank you. Love the idea of timelines, and you've encouraged me to look at electronic ways to organise all my materials and notes.

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  121. Cynthia, thanks for sharing an in depth look at your process. Everything is so well organized!

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  122. What an all-encompassing post, Cynthia! I love Evernote, but don't always remember to use it. Thanks for the reminder!

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  123. This post was absolute gold. This is the clearest system I've ever seen. Thank you for sharing it!

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  124. Your organizational process is incredible. Thanks so much for sharing your process with us.

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  125. Thank you for taking us through your organizational process. Very impressive. I've been using One Note, but may have to give Evernote a try.

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  126. Cynthia, you have given us much in your explanations and examples. Thank you so much.

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  127. WOW. Cynthia. When you mentioned this a few weeks ago I didn't fully understand how detailed your process is. You seem to have really harnessed the power of digital record-keeping. Something I've yet to master.

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  128. This is so helpful! I keep trying different ways of digital record keeping, but I don't get very far. I am going to try Evernote. BUT what I can jump into right now are those timelines! I especially love the big picture. I may make a column saying "Why does it matter?" to make me really look at what's important. Thank you!!

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  129. Collecting too much information until I'm bogged down is my fault as a writer. I can't seem to decide when to quit. I think organizing it better from the get-go will help me see the gaps and needs in my research.

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  130. Making all sources searchable sounds super helpful!

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  131. Thank you! Fascinating to see how you keep everything organized and how the organization affects your thinking!

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  132. Oh my goodness, you are so organized. Thanks for sharing your methods, but also showing how many other ways there are to manage information. I've tried all of those except from Schrivner. Thank you!

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  133. Timelines! Now that you say it, of course.
    But this definitely falls in my category of "so obvious, I needed someone to point it out to me."
    Thanks for sharing.

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  134. Thanks for the tips on organizing. It's my Achilles' heel.

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  135. Thank you thank you for sharing your organizing process with us. I never thought to make a timeline or date when I found some research. I very recently began using Evernote. I don't know how I lived without it. Its utterly fantastic. Now I have to stop commenting, I have a lot to catch up on!

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  136. Thanks for sharing how you organize your information! It's helpful to see how you correlate things to make it easier to see the connections.

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  137. Thank you for sharing the options for organizing research and also your specific methods for organization!

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  138. Thanks for the tips! I'm still trying to find a good system for organizing my research, so I'll have to give Evernote a try.

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  139. WOW. Organization is hard for me but your tips will make it easier. Maria Johnson

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  140. Wow Cynthia! This is great stuff.
    I just purchased Supernotecard. I'll have to see if it does all of the things that Evernote does. Question- How do you save your video- from the internet? History Channel, etc? Is there a problem with saving the content if it's for research and not for resale? Thanks for all of the organizing hints! Great post.

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  141. Thank you for letting me peak into your research/note taking process.

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  142. Thank you so much for sharing your organization tips, Cynthia! I'm excited to experiment with Evernote!

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  143. Like most or all of us, I'm sure, we love the research and digging. But, I'm overwhelmed by how much there is. I'm a notebook fan, but know that's not enough! So, showing Evernote was a help, Cynthia! Most helpful to me, though, was showing the importance and details of timelines--the big picture. Thank you!

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  144. Wow, what an eye-opening approach to organization. Thank you for the peek into your process. It's tremendously helpful.

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